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MYSTERY TALES #2
CGC VG/F: 5.0
SOLD ON:  Thursday, 10/29/2020 6:26 PM
$156
Sold For
11
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This auction has ended.
PUBLISHER: Atlas
COMMENTS: ow/white pgs
Krigstein art; Everett art; giant gorilla story
Second City Collection
Read Description ▼

DESCRIPTION
ow/white pgs
Krigstein art; Everett art; giant gorilla story
Second City Collection
Ogden Whitney, who submitted "The Crawling Horror" story to this issue of Mystery Tales was best known for his creation, Herbie Popnecker, a rotund super-hero spoof that went on to become a popular cult character. It was these unsung heroes that toiled away in relative obscurity during these low days of the comic industry who were responsible for churning out titles like Mystery Tales for Atlas, as they hung on by their fingernails until their luck would change for the better. Some of the other tales of terror in this book are "This Corpse is Mine", "The Rat Race", and "He Went for a Train-Ride".


Artist Information

Bill Everett Comic was an American comic book writer-artist best known for creating Namor the Sub-Mariner as well as co-creating Daredevil with writer Stan Lee for Marvel Comics. Everett fell into comics almost by accident in their very earliest days, creating the character Amazing-Man for Centaur Publications in 1939. Also in 1939 he would contribute the first Sub-Mariner story for Marvel Mystery Comics #1, the very first book from Timely Comics, which would eventually become Marvel Comics, Sub-Mariner would prove to be one of their earliest hits and Everett would continue drawing his adventures until 1949. in the 50s Everett wold continue working for what was now Atlas Comics on numerous titles, occasionally reviving Sub-Mariner. in the 60s with the explosion of the Marvel Age Everett would co-create with Stan Lee and draw the first issue of Daredevil in addition to providing work in Tales to Astonish and Strange Tales. The Sub-Mariner would return again in Tales to Astonish #85 continuing there and then in his own title, with sporadic contributions from Everett. Bill Everett died suddenly at the age of 55 in 1973.